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Optimizing 10GBe Network with NVMe Disk Subsystem on Ubuntu

Optimizing 10GBe Network with NVMe Disk Subsystem on Ubuntu

Optimizing your 10GBe network and NVMe disk subsystem on Ubuntu can significantly improve the performance of your system. By fine-tuning various parameters such as sysctl settings, scheduler, and network buffers, you can achieve better throughput and lower latency. In this guide, we will explore some optimization techniques and provide examples of commands, scripts, and ideas to help you get the most out of your network and disk subsystem.

Optimizing the Network

1. Increase Network Buffers

By increasing the network buffers, you can accommodate larger bursts of traffic and reduce packet drops. To increase the network buffers, use the following command:

sudo sysctl -w net.core.rmem_max=16777216

This command sets the maximum receive buffer size to 16MB. Adjust the value as per your requirements. Similarly, you can also increase the send buffer size using the following command:

sudo sysctl -w net.core.wmem_max=16777216

2. Enable Jumbo Frames

Jumbo frames allow you to transmit larger packets, reducing the overhead of processing smaller packets. To enable jumbo frames, you need to set the MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) size to a larger value. For example, to set the MTU size to 9000, use the following command:

sudo ifconfig eth0 mtu 9000

Replace “eth0” with the appropriate network interface name.

3. Disable TCP Offloading

TCP offloading can sometimes cause performance issues, especially with high-speed networks. To disable TCP offloading, use the following command:

sudo ethtool -K eth0 tso off

Replace “eth0” with the appropriate network interface name.

Optimizing the NVMe Disk Subsystem

1. Set I/O Scheduler

Choosing the right I/O scheduler can significantly impact the performance of your NVMe disk subsystem. The “mq-deadline” scheduler is recommended for NVMe drives. To set the I/O scheduler, use the following command:

sudo echo "mq-deadline" > /sys/block/nvme0n1/queue/scheduler

Replace “nvme0n1” with the appropriate NVMe drive name.

2. Enable TRIM Support

TRIM allows the operating system to inform the SSD which blocks of data are no longer in use, improving performance and extending the lifespan of the drive. To enable TRIM support, use the following command:

sudo systemctl enable fstrim.timer

This command enables the periodic TRIM operation on all mounted filesystems.

3. Disable Swap

If you have enough RAM to handle your workload, disabling swap can improve the performance of your NVMe disk subsystem. To disable swap, use the following command:

sudo swapoff -a

This command disables all swap partitions.

Useful Commands and Scripts

Here are some additional commands and scripts that can help you optimize your 10GBe network and NVMe disk subsystem:

1. Network Optimization Script

You can create a script to automate the network optimization process. Here’s an example:

#!/bin/bash

# Increase network buffers
sudo sysctl -w net.core.rmem_max=16777216
sudo sysctl -w net.core.wmem_max=16777216

# Enable jumbo frames
sudo ifconfig eth0 mtu 9000

# Disable TCP offloading
sudo ethtool -K eth0 tso off

2. Disk Subsystem Optimization Script

You can also create a script to automate the optimization of your NVMe disk subsystem. Here’s an example:

#!/bin/bash

# Set I/O scheduler
sudo echo “mq-deadline” > /sys/block/nvme0n1/queue/scheduler

# Enable TRIM support
sudo systemctl enable fstrim.timer

# Disable swap
sudo swapoff -a

Summary

In this guide, we explored various optimization techniques for your 10GBe network and NVMe disk subsystem on Ubuntu. By adjusting network buffers, enabling jumbo frames, disabling TCP offloading, setting the right I/O scheduler, enabling TRIM support, and disabling swap, you can achieve better performance and lower latency. Use the provided commands, scripts, and ideas to fine-tune your system and get the most out of your network and disk subsystem.

Useful Data

Here is a table summarizing the commands and their purposes:

Command Purpose
sudo sysctl -w net.core.rmem_max=16777216 Increase receive buffer size
sudo sysctl -w net.core.wmem_max=16777216 Increase send buffer size
sudo ifconfig eth0 mtu 9000 Enable jumbo frames
sudo ethtool -K eth0 tso off Disable TCP offloading
sudo echo "mq-deadline" > /sys/block/nvme0n1/queue/scheduler Set I/O scheduler
sudo systemctl enable fstrim.timer Enable TRIM support
sudo swapoff -a Disable swap

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